Category Archives: Classroom Examples

Using CalcPlot3D to explore the world of quantum mechanics

By: Keir Fogarty, Ph.D. In the early 20th century, humankind’s understanding of the world of atoms and subatomic particles underwent a revolution; we went from understanding atoms as something like teeny billiard balls to the abstract concepts of quantum mechanics. … Continue reading

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Hidden gem: Time dependent vector fields

You have probably seen the “Add a Vector Field” option under the Graph menu in CalcPlot3D which allows you to create some nifty three-dimensional vector fields like the one below. But did you know that you can add a parameter … Continue reading

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Parametric Heart

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Script to find an intersection of two surfaces and a tangent line

This is a script that I use in class to validate and visualize the results of a 2 step problem which asks students to find a parametric equation representing the intersection of two surfaces:  z=x^2+3y^2 and x=y^2 and then to find the tangent … Continue reading

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3D model finished!

My first attempt at a 3D printed model was finished today.   Next time I’ll refine the grid so that the surface isn’t so faceted, but I’m happy with the result.  I can’t wait to create more.

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3D Model Take 2

Since the printer head broke during my first attempt at printing a 3D model, I took the opportunity to adjust my graph to something more interesting. I showed my previous attempt to a few colleagues and students.  One former student … Continue reading

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3D model

My first attempt at printing a 3D surface from a CalcPlot3D generated file ended prematurely due to a broken printer head. But this gives me the chance to make adjustments to the surface for an even more interesting example.

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